Cremation Options

Understanding Cremation

Cremation is just one step in the commemorative process – an important step in preparing the remains for memorialization. When made part of a meaningful funeral service, cremation can play a vital role in the healing journey. Some may feel that by cremating a body, they are somehow eliminating the pain associated with their loss. Cremation is not a way of eliminating your grief, but a process of preparing your loved one for his or her final resting place. There are many options open to you when it comes to honoring your loved one's life: you can provide a chance for friends and family to say goodbye through a final viewing before the cremation, and you can also hold a formal service either before or after the cremation occurs. After the cremation itself, there are a variety of choices for your loved one's final disposition. When you choose to care for the physical remains through cremation, we encourage you to consider holding a memorial service as well.


Interment
means that you'll bury or entomb your loved one's cremated remains. This can be in the family plot, a memorial site, a cremation niche or urn garden, or in a variety of other indoor and outdoor locations. Ask our staff for a detailed list of interment possibilities.

Graveside Services are similar to those celebrated alongside a traditional ground burial, in which loved ones are present at the burial of the cremated remains and honor the deceased through memorial prayers or other meaningful tributes.

Scattering allows you to spread your loved one's cremated remains in a memorial garden, a cemetery, over water, or across any other meaningful site. You can also choose to scatter some of the cremated remains and retain the rest in an urn for internment or another form of disposition.

Placing cremated remains in multiple urns allows family members who are separated by distance to each feel the comfort of having their loved one's final resting place in a nearby location.

 

 

Cremation FAQ's

What is cremation?

Cremation is the process by which a body is exposed to extreme heat, usually 1800 - 2000 degrees Fahrenheit for two hours or more. Through this process the body is reduced to its basic elements, which are referred to as the "cremated remains". Cremation occurs at a crematorium in a special kind of furnace called a cremation chamber or retort.

What happens after the cremation is complete?

All organic bone fragments, which are very brittle, as well as non-consumed metal items are "swept" into the front of the cremation chamber and into a stainless steel cooling pan. All non-consumed items, like metal from clothing, hip joints, and bridge work, are separated from the cremated remains. This separation is accomplished through visual inspection as well as using a strong magnet for smaller and minute metallic objects. Items such as dental gold and silver are non-recoverable and are commingled in with the cremated remains. Remaining bone fragments are then processed in a machine to a consistent size and placed into a temporary container.

What do the cremated remains look like?

Cremated remains resemble coarse sand and are whitish to light grey in color. The remains of an average size adult usually weigh between four to eight pounds of cremated remains.

In what kind of container are the cremated remains returned?

The cremated remains may be returned to you in the container provided by the crematory or in an urn of your choice.

What can be done with the cremated remains?

There are many options. Remains can be buried in a cemetery lot or cremation garden, inurned in a columbarium, kept at home, or scattered on private property. Our staff will be happy to discuss these options with you and make any arrangements.

 

 

Concerns About Cremation

Are there any laws governing cremation?

Yes, New Jersey State Law states that no person can cremate a dead human body unless at least 24 hours have elapsed from the time of death as recorded on the death certificate to the time of cremation.

Can two cremations be performed at once?

No. It is illegal to do so, also, cremation chambers can only accommodate one adult body.

Can the family witness the cremation?

Yes, for a nominal fee charged from the crematory. The Cremation Facility is set up to allow family members to be present when the body is placed into the cremation chamber.

How can I be sure I receive the correct remains?

All responsible cremation providers have thorough operating policies and procedures in order to provide the highest level of service and reduce the possibility of human error.

 

 

Questions About Urns, Caskets Embalming

Do I need an urn?

An urn is not required by law. However, an urn may be desired if there is to be a memorial service or the cremated remains are to be interred in a cemetery. If an urn is not selected, the cremated remains will be returned in a temporary plastic container.

Is a casket needed for cremation?

No, a casket is not required for cremation. All that is required by state law is a rigid container which is cremated with the body.

Is embalming required prior to cremation?

Embalming is NOT required by law if cremation takes place within 48 hours.

No human remains may remain unburied or uncremated in New Jersey for more then 48 hours unless embalmed or refrigerated. (N.J.A.C. 8:9-1.1)

Can the body be viewed without embalming?

Yes, immediate family members may briefly view the deceased prior to cremation in our private viewing room. The deceased is first washed, dressed and prepared for viewing. However, under certain circumstances embalming may be required, such as a public visitation.

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